Regulation of Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Trafficking in Fragile X

Regulation of Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Trafficking in Fragile X

With an $83,500 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation in 2005 and 2007, Dr. Anna Fracesconi at Albert Einstein College studied the patterns and pathways of different receptors related to Fragile X.

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Decreased Excitatory Drive onto Parvalbumin-Positive Neocortical Inhibitory Neurons in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome

Decreased Excitatory Drive onto Parvalbumin-Positive Neocortical Inhibitory Neurons in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome

With an $80,000 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation over 2006-7, Drs. Jay Gibson and Kimberly Huber at the University of Texas at Southwestern examined if the defected inhibitory neurotransmission was a primary or secondary symptom of Fragile X to determine where future treatment targets should be focused.

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Baclofen: GABA(B) Receptor Supersensitivity and Normalization of Behavioral Abnormalities by Various GABA(B) Agonists Including Baclofen in FMRP Deficient Mice

Baclofen: GABA(B) Receptor Supersensitivity and Normalization of Behavioral Abnormalities by Various GABA(B) Agonists Including Baclofen in FMRP Deficient Mice

With $110,000 in grants from FRAXA Research Foundation over several years, Dr. Miklos Toth from Cornell University discovered increased startle response in Fragile X mice and that baclofen can correct this phenotype.

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Experimental Compound FRAX486 Reverses Signs of Fragile X in Mice

Experimental Compound FRAX486 Reverses Signs of Fragile X in Mice

With an $81,000 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation from 2005-2006, Dr. Susumu Tonegawa and his team at MIT studied the enzyme PAK to determine how it could be used for a treatment target. Results published.

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Therapeutic Interventions in FMR1 Knockout and Transgenic Mice: Role of the FMR1 Gene

Therapeutic Interventions in FMR1 Knockout and Transgenic Mice: Role of the FMR1 Gene

With a $229,000 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation in 2006, Drs. Richard Paylor, David Albeck, and Francis Brennan at the Baylor College of Medicine found that, in mice as in humans, the level of Fragile X protein in brain cells plays a prominent role in determining levels of activity and anxiety.

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Splicing Variations of the Fragile X Gene

Splicing Variations of the Fragile X Gene

With an $80,000 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation from 2005-2006, Dr. David Morris and his team at the University of Washington team aimed to understand the variation in distribution and function of FMRP isoforms, sought to identify isoforms of FMRP in mouse brain, and define the expression pattern of these versions of the protein.

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Social Deficits in Fragile X Syndrome: Do Gene-Gene Interactions Play a Role?

Social Deficits in Fragile X Syndrome: Do Gene-Gene Interactions Play a Role?

With a $100,000 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation from 2005-2006, Drs. Jean Lauder and Sheryl Moy at the University of North Carolina looked for gene-gene interactions in Fragile X syndrome.

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Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Function in Fragile X Knockout Mice

Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Function in Fragile X Knockout Mice

With $143,000 in grants from FRAXA Research Foundation from 2004-2006, Drs. Walter Kaufmann, Richard Huganier, Paul Worley, and David Lieberman at Johns Hopkins University studied the molecular dynamics of mGluRs in areas involved in cognition in the Fragile X knockout mouse.

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Role of FMRP Interacting Protein CYFIP1 in Prader-Willi and Fragile X Syndromes

Role of FMRP Interacting Protein CYFIP1 in Prader-Willi and Fragile X Syndromes

With a $105,000 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation from 2005-2006, Dr. Yong-Hui Jiang at Baylor College of Medicine explored the relationship between Fragile X syndrome and Prader-Willi syndrome.

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Drosophila CYFIP, a Molecular Link Between Actin Cytoskeleton Remodeling and Fragile X

Drosophila CYFIP, a Molecular Link Between Actin Cytoskeleton Remodeling and Fragile X

With $130,000 in funding from FRAXA Research Foundationfrom 2004-2006, Dr. Angela Giangrande at the Universite Louis Pasteur investigated the interactions between dendrites, messenger mRNA, and the cytoskeleton in fruit flies, which are a simple yet powerful system in which multiple genes can be manipulated with relative ease.

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Genetic and Behavioral Analyses of the dFMR1 Pathway in Drosophila Peripheral Nervous System

Genetic and Behavioral Analyses of the dFMR1 Pathway in Drosophila Peripheral Nervous System

With a $160,000 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation from 2004-2006, Dr. Fen-Biao Gao and his team at the University of California studied the relationship between mRNA and FMRP.

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Transcriptional Regulation of the Fragile X Gene

Transcriptional Regulation of the Fragile X Gene

With a $60,000 in grant from FRAXA Research Foundation, Dr. Justin Fallon and his team at Brown University studied systematic mapping of Fragile X granules in developing mouse brains, revealing a potential role for presynaptic FMRP in sensorimotor functions.

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Alterations in Neocortical Neuron Excitability Associated with Fragile X

Alterations in Neocortical Neuron Excitability Associated with Fragile X

With a $107,000 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation from 2005-2006, Dr. Charles Cox at the University of Illinois looked for alterations in the intrinsic excitability of individual neurons within the visual neocortex in Fragile X syndrome.

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Pharmacologic Interventions in the Fmr1 KO Mouse

Pharmacologic Interventions in the Fmr1 KO Mouse

With $48,600 in grants from FRAXA Research Foundation over 2004-2006, Dr. Catherine Choi at Drexel University studied Fragile X knockout mice to determine future treatment targets for Fragile X syndrome in humans.

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FMR Expression in Zebra Finch

FMR Expression in Zebra Finch

With a $18,500 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation in 2006, Dr. Stephanie Ceman fromthe University of Illinois studied Fragile X in zebra finches to better understand the impairments of verbal expression in individuals with Fragile X syndrome. Results published.

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Transgenic Mouse Models of Fragile X Syndrome

Transgenic Mouse Models of Fragile X Syndrome

With $736,000 in grants from FRAXA Research Foundation over 2000-2007, Dr. Robert Bauchwitz at Columbia University developed 15 transgenic mouse models of Fragile X syndrome, using them to evaluate a range of experimental treatments. Results published.

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The Role of MicroRNAs in the Pathogenesis of Fragile X

The Role of MicroRNAs in the Pathogenesis of Fragile X

With a $70,000 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation from 2004-2005, Drs. Thomas Tuschl and Neil Renwick and their team at Rockefeller University researched how FMRP interacts with miRNA in order to determine more effective treatment targets for Fragile X syndrome.

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Intracortical Circuitry in the Barrel Cortex of FMR1-KO Mice

Intracortical Circuitry in the Barrel Cortex of FMR1-KO Mice

With $40,000 in funding from FRAXA Research Foundation in 2005, Dr. Karel Svoboda and his team at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory imaged neocortical circuits in Fragile X mice to determine the functions of the abnormal dendritic spines found in Fragile X syndrome.

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Connection Between Fragile X Syndrome and RNAi

Connection Between Fragile X Syndrome and RNAi

With a $75,000 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation from 2003-2004, Dr. Richard Carthew and his team at Northwestern University studied their interest in gene expression by investigating the role of the recently discovered process of interfering RNA (RNAi). FMRP appears to be involved in the metabolism of RNAi, and may have a role in regulating the process; likewise, deficits in RNAi may contribute to the disease process in Fragile X.

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Generating Human Neurons Carrying the Fragile X Mutation

Generating Human Neurons Carrying the Fragile X Mutation

With a $50,000 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation, Dr. Clive Svendsen and his team at the University of Wisconsin grew neural stem cells that expressed the Fragile X mutation to help scientists better understand the gene characteristics. 

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