Recruiting: Facematch Fragile X Project at University of Newcastle

Recruiting: Facematch Fragile X Project at University of Newcastle

The FaceMatch project is using computer face-matching technology to help find a diagnosis for children with intellectual disability (ID) where genetic testing has not provided an answer. As we know, the time prior to diagnosis is one of the toughest periods in the journey of our children and we hope that the inclusion of families such as yours with a known diagnosis may help those families who are still searching for a diagnosis.

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fNIRS to Measure Treatment Response in Young Children with Fragile X

fNIRS to Measure Treatment Response in Young Children with Fragile X

FRAXA Research Foundation has awarded a $90,000 research grant to Dr. Craig Erickson and Dr. Elizabeth Smith at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital to test functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), in children who have Fragile X syndrome. fNIRS is safe, non-invasive, and easily-tolerated. It uses light sources and sensors on the scalp to build a heat map of the brain in action.

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Recruiting: Metformin Clinical Trial for Ages 16-50 with Fragile X Syndrome

Recruiting: Metformin Clinical Trial for Ages 16-50 with Fragile X Syndrome

FRAXA Research Foundation is funding a clinical trial of metformin for teens and adults with Fragile X syndrome. The trial is being conducted by Dr. Sean McBride at Rowan University in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania. Men and women ages 16-50 with Fragile X syndrome are invited to participate.

Dr. Sean McBride and Seth BooryRead more

Fragile X Clinical Trial of AZD7325 in Adults

Fragile X Clinical Trial of AZD7325 in Adults

With a $51,000 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation, Dr. Craig Erickson conducting a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of AZD7325 in adults ages 18-50 with Fragile X syndrome at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital.  The compound being studied is an investigational new drug from AstraZeneca that targets GABA (A) receptors.

Craig Erickson, MD, Cincinnati Children's HospitalRead more