How Promising is CRISPR for Fragile X?

How Promising is CRISPR for Fragile X?

Dave Bjork, Director of Community Relations, recently sat down with Peter Todd, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurology in the University of Michigan Medical School. Dr. Todd was recently awarded a FRAXA Research Grant for gene reactivation with the use of CRISPR. In this interview he tells us about CRISPR in Fragile X research, how realistic is it that it could turn the Fragile X gene back on, and if it can really be a cure for Fragile X.

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Bryostatin Restores Learning and Memory in Adult Fragile X Mice

Bryostatin Restores Learning and Memory in Adult Fragile X Mice
Just as the Amazon rainforest may hold a cure for cancer if only scientists can find it, a bizarre marine critter found off the California coast — Bugula neritina— is the only known source of a potential new Fragile X treatment, Bryostatin. Last month, FRAXA sat down with scientists from Neurotrope BioScience, a specialty biopharmaceutical company developing medicines for rare diseases and Alzheimer’s based on Bryostatin. Their Fragile X program is based on research by a West Virginia team led by Daniel Alkon, MD, which showed that Bryostatin-1 restores hippocampal synapses and spatial learning and memory in adult Fragile X mice. “Our results show that synaptic and cognitive function of adult FXS mice can be normalized through pharmacologic treatment and that bryostatin-1-like agents may represent a novel class of drugs to treat Fragile X mental retardation even after postpartum brain development has largely completed,” remarked Dr. Alkon. Bugula and Bryostatins Often mistaken for seaweed, bugula is actually colonies of small animals, likeRead more

Role of Experience in Regulating Levels of the Fragile X Protein

Role of Experience in Regulating Levels of the Fragile X Protein

FRAXA Research Grant to Kenneth J. Mack, MD, PhD — Mayo Clinic with Peter K. Todd, MD, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow   FRAXA Awards: $29,000 in 2001 $20,000 in 2000 Final Report on Dr. Mack’s Project While a professor at University of Wisconsin-Madison, Dr. Mack investigated whether and how FMRP levels are regulated in response to neuronal stimulation in vivo (in live animals). He looked at the effects of seizures and of experience in his experiments. Dr. Mack and colleagues published their findings in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences: The Fragile X mental retardation protein is required for type-I metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent translation of PSD-95 Peter K. Todd, Kenneth J. Mack, and James S. Malter PNAS | November 25, 2003 | vol. 100 | no. 24

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