Three-Dimensional Model for Identifying Fragile X Treatments

Three-Dimensional Model for Identifying Fragile X Treatments
With a $90,000 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation awarded in 2018, Dr. Peng Jin and Dr. Juhnee Kang at Emory University will develop and analyze fragile X brain organoids to understand the disorder and identify treatment targets. $90,000 Grant Peng Jin, PhD Principal Investigator Yunhee Kang, PhD FRAXA Postdoctoral Fellow Zhexing Wen, PhD Co-Principal Investigator Emory University School of Medicine 2018 FRAXA Research Grant $90,000 over 2 Years by Peng Jin One of the most exciting recent advancements in stem cell research has been the development of a new model that bridges the gap between mice and humans. Chosen as 2017 Method of the Year by Nature, organoids are tiny, self-organized, three-dimensional tissue cultures grown from stem cells. They can be crafted to model much of the complexity of any organ — even the brain. This new technique affords the opportunity to evaluate potential drug treatments in a model that more closely mimics the humanRead more

Sensory Hypersensibility in Fragile X Syndrome and BK Channel Openers

Sensory Hypersensibility in Fragile X Syndrome and BK Channel Openers

With $366,100 in grants from FRAXA Research Foundation, these investigators at the University of Orleans studied sensory abnormalities in fragile X mice and test the ability of a class of drugs, BK channel openers, to rescue these abnormalities.

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Scientists Uncover Trigger for Fragile X syndrome

Finding May Explain Many Brain Disorders, Lead to Prevention and Treatment adapted from Weill Cornell Medical College press release   A new study led by Weill Cornell Medical College scientists shows that Fragile X syndrome occurs because of a mechanism that shuts off the gene associated with the disease. The findings, published today in Science, also show that a compound that blocks this silencing mechanism can prevent fragile X syndrome – suggesting a similar therapy may be possible for 20 other diseases that range from mental retardation to multisystem failure. While researchers have known for more than two decades that the culprit behind Fragile X is an unusual mutation characterized by the excess repetition of a particular segment of the genetic code, they weren’t sure why the presence of a large number of these repetitions – 200 or more – sets the disease process in motion. Using stem cells from donated human embryos

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Creation of a Mouse Model to Test FMR1 Gene Reactivation

Creation of a Mouse Model to Test FMR1 Gene Reactivation

With $146,000 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation over 2012-2013, Drs. Anita Bhattacharyya and Xinyu Zhao at the University of Wisconsin developed a new mouse model of fragile X syndrome which will enable testing of gene reactivation and gene therapy approaches to treatment. They transplanted human Fragile X neural cells differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells into brains of neonatal mice and then testing for FMR1 reactivation. In 2015, The John Merck Fund assumed support for this work with a generous grant of $750,000 to the scientists.

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Small Molecule Screen using Fragile X Neural Stem Cells

Small Molecule Screen using Fragile X Neural Stem Cells

With a $90,000 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation from 2009-2010, Dr. Peng Jin and his team at Emory University found that fragile X causes an increased production of new cells, so they tested large numbers of drugs to find those that can correct this. This high throughput drug screen uses neural stem cells from fragile X knockout mice to identify small molecules which may be therapeutic in fragile X.

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