Pharmacological Tolerance in the Treatment of Fragile X Syndrome

Pharmacological Tolerance in the Treatment of Fragile X Syndrome

With a $90,000 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation over 2018-2019, Dr. Patrick McCamphill, postdoctoral fellow in Dr. Mark Bear’s lab at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), is investigating drug tolerance to mGluR5 antagonists, arbaclofen, and other potential Fragile X treatments. He is also exploring ways to overcome it.

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Fragile X Syndrome Research & Treatment • FRAXA Research Foundation – Finding a Cure for Fragile X

Fragile X Syndrome Research & Treatment • FRAXA Research Foundation – Finding a Cure for Fragile X

FRAXA Research Foundation’s mission is to find effective treatments and ultimately a cure for Fragile X syndrome. Fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited cause of autism and intellectual disabilities We directly fund research grants and fellowships at top universities around the world. We partner with biomedical and pharmaceutical companies, large and small, to bridge the gap between research discoveries and actual treatments.

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Repurposing Available Drugs to Treat Fragile X Syndrome – FRAXA Initiatives

Repurposing Available Drugs to Treat Fragile X Syndrome – FRAXA Initiatives

FRAXA Research Foundation was founded in 1994 to fund biomedical research aimed at finding a cure for Fragile X syndrome and, ultimately, autism. We prioritize translational research with the potential to lead to improved treatments for Fragile X in the near term. Our early efforts involved supporting a great deal of basic neuroscience to understand the cause of Fragile X. By 1996, these efforts had already begun to yield results useful for drug repurposing. To date, FRAXA has funded well over $25 million in research, with over $3 million of that for repurposing existing drugs for Fragile X.

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Clinical Trials in Fragile X Syndrome

Clinical Trials in Fragile X Syndrome

Each study is supervised by a doctor that specializes in Fragile X. These trials are free, you do not have to tell your insurance company, and you can leave any time you want. Travel costs are usually covered.

The FDA requires two successful large-scale clinical trials before it will consider approving a new treatment. If studies are successful and the FDA approves new drugs, others with Fragile X can also have access to these medicines.

Ray Turner, PhD and Xiaoqin Zhan, PhDRead more

FRAXA Contributes $10,000 to NIH grant to Seaside Therapeutics

FRAXA Contributes $10,000 to NIH grant to Seaside Therapeutics

Randy Carpenter, MD Principal Investigator with Mark Bear, PhD, MIT Co-Investigator (2007) conducted a clinical development of mGluR5 antagonists to treat Fragile X Syndrome and Autism. Seaside Therapeutics received a major grant from the NIH, with additional funding from FRAXA and Cure Autism Now (CAN) to develop STX107, a selective mGluR5 antagonist, as a treatment for Fragile X. Unfortunately, Seaside has since discontinued development of STX107.

Randall Carpenter, MD, at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, FRAXA research grantRead more

Clinical Trials FAQ ← Frequently Asked Questions

Question: How Do Families Decide Which Trial is Best for Them? Answer: Each of the trials has different requirements for joining, so many – if not most – people will only be eligible for one trial after screening. The best way to approach this is to call the clinic contact closest to your area and discuss this with him/her. Age, weight, current medications, behavior, and IQ are all factors.

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3 Researchers Honored at FRAXA Investigators Meeting

Over 150 scientists from around the globe gathered in Durham, New Hampshire, for FRAXA Research Foundation’s Investigators Meeting on September 21-24, 2008. They came from Australia, Canada, India, Turkey, the U.S., and eight European countries. Their common goal: “to share, collaborate and publish,” in the words of FRAXA’s Medical Director, Michael Tranfaglia, MD, to find effective treatments and a cure for Fragile X, the foremost inherited cause of mental retardation and autism. Most of the attendees were university-based professors, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students who have FRAXA research grants. Also participating in the meeting were scientists from the National Institutes of Health (NIMH, NICHD, and NINDS), Neuropharm Group PLC, Hoffman LaRoche Inc., GlaxoSmithKline, Indevus, and Seaside Therapeutics, as well as 20 parents of Fragile X children.

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Mark Bear’s Goal: Disease-Modifying Treatments for Fragile X

Mark Bear’s Goal: Disease-Modifying Treatments for Fragile X

Researcher Mark Bear, PhD, Picower Professor of Neuroscience, sees success developing disease-modifying treatments for Fragile X syndrome and other developmental brain disorders. Finally, hope. And it comes from his lab, The Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Mark Bear lab - Fragile X Read more

Aberrant Behavior Checklist in Fragile X Syndrome

Aberrant Behavior Checklist in Fragile X Syndrome

With a $10,000 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation, Dr. Hessl at the University of California at Davis led a collaborative study to analyze the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC) as an outcome measure for children and adults with Fragile X syndrome. Results published.

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