Kimberly Huber, Ph.D., FRAXA Investigator

Evaluation of CamKII Dependent Regulation of mGluR5-Homer Scaffolds as a Potential Therapeutic for Fragile X Syndrome

Dr. Huber made the original discovery of the mGluR Theory of Fragile X when she was a postdoctoral fellow in the lab of Dr. Mark Bear, with her first FRAXA grant in 2000. Dr. Huber has received $474,300 in grants from FRAXA Research Foundation since then, researching molecular mechanisms and developmental switches in fragile X syndrome. She has worked with 4 FRAXA Postdoctoral Fellows (Elena Nosyreva, PhD in 2006; Jennifer Roseni, PhD in 2007; Tong Zang, PhD in 2010-2011; and Weirui Guo, PhD in 2012-2013) and has received supporting funds from The Meadows Foundation of/for Texas.

Genetic and Pharmacologic Manipulation of PI3K Activity in FXS: Assessing Potential Therapeutic Value

Dr. Bassell’s team has developed powerful molecular genetic techniques to track mRNAs and FMRP particles as they move through these processes in brain tissue from fragile X knockout mice. They have shown that a specific intracellular signaling pathway, the PI3K/mTOR pathway, is overactive in the absence of FMRP. This pathway is involved in mediating many neuronal neurotransmitter receptors. This project will test new drugs in development which inhibit an enzyme known as PI3 kinase, a part of the pathway, and have the potential to normalize neuronal function in fragile X.

Efficient Screening for Pharmaceutical Amelioration of FXS Behavioral Deficits in Drosophila

With a $112,250 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation over 3 years, Dr. Efthimios Skoulakis and his team from the Institute of Cellular and Developmental Biology conducted the first FRAXA project in Greece, where they developed a speedy new test for learning problems in fruit flies, which allowed them to test a number of drugs that are potential fragile X treatments.