Fragile X Research Tackles High Anxiety – Peter Vanderklish

Fragile X Research Tackles High Anxiety – Peter Vanderklish

Yes, we all know the signs of fragile X anxiety: Ears begin turning red followed by incessant pacing, heavy breathing, stiffening body, flapping, jumping, avoidance or yelling. Sometimes, it’s the more severe screaming, pinching, scratching, biting and general tearing things up or, worse, the nuclear meltdown.

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Function of FMRP and Test of a Novel Therapeutic Approach in a Fragile X Mouse Model

Function of FMRP and Test of a Novel Therapeutic Approach in a Fragile X Mouse Model

With a 2015-2016 $90,000 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation, Dr. Herve Moine and Dr. Andrea Geoffroy aim to uncover the exact role of FMRP and to test a novel possible means to correct for FMRP absence in the mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

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Correcting Defects in Astrocyte Signaling in Fragile X Syndrome

Correcting Defects in Astrocyte Signaling in Fragile X Syndrome

With a $90,000 grant from the FRAXA Research Foundation from 2015-2016, Dr. Laurie Doering and Dr. Angela Scott at McMasters University studied astrocytes in fragile X. Astrocytes, brain cells which support neurons, do not transmit signals. Several treatment strategies for fragile X have been proposed based on correction of “astrocyte phenotypes”.

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Fragile X Mutant Mouse Facility

Fragile X Mutant Mouse Facility

With $375,000 in grants from the FRAXA Research Foundation since 2009, Dr. David Nelson has developed an impressive array of advanced mouse models of fragile X, at Baylor College of Medicine. These models are available to investigators worldwide on request. This resource has been essential for a broad, rapid distribution of fragile X and related gene mouse models and has increased the pace of fragile X research.

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Repurposing Drugs to Dampen Hyperactive Nonsense-Mediated Decay in Fragile X Syndrome

Repurposing Drugs to Dampen Hyperactive Nonsense-Mediated Decay in Fragile X Syndrome

With a $90,000 grant from the FRAXA Research Foundation, Dr. Lynne Maquat and Dr. Tatsuaki Kurosaki will investigate nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) in fragile X. NMD is a “housekeeping” process that cells use to prevent faulty proteins from being made. But there is too much of it in fragile X syndrome. There are already available drugs that suppress NMD – including caffeine.

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Cellular-Specific Therapeutic Targeting of Inhibitory Circuits in Fragile X Syndrome

Cellular-Specific Therapeutic Targeting of Inhibitory Circuits in Fragile X Syndrome

Studies have shown that the function of inhibitory networks is disturbed in fragile X. This abnormality is not well understood but appears to be secondary to abnormalities in metabotropic glutamate and endocannabinoid systems. With a $90,000 grant from FRAXA in 2013-2014, Dr. Molly Huntsman’s team examined how these networks interact and how inhibitory deficits can best be remedied.

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Functional Interplay Between FMRP and CDK5 Signaling

Functional Interplay Between FMRP and CDK5 Signaling

With a $180,000 grant from the FRAXA Research Foundation over 2011-2014, Dr. Yue Feng and Dr. Wenqi Li at Emory University will study CDK5 pathway function and regulation in an effort to break down whether and how CDK5 signaling is affected by the loss of the fragile X protein, FMRP, in the fragile X mouse model.

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Computational Analysis of Neural Circuit Disruption in Fragile X Model Mice

Computational Analysis of Neural Circuit Disruption in Fragile X Model Mice

Computer modeling of the brain offers the hope of predicting how the brain responds to varying conditions, but these models have been rather primitive until recently. The Sejnowski team at the Salk Institute, who specialize in computational models of neural networks, will take the results of previous FRAXA-funded projects and incorporate them into their advanced computer models of brain function.

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Synaptic Characterization of Human Fragile X Neurons

Synaptic Characterization of Human Fragile X Neurons

With a $90,000 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation over 2013-14, Dr. Marius Wernig and Dr. Samuele Marro at Stanford analyzed homeostatic plasticity and regulation of synaptic strength by retinoic acid. If the results are encouraging, they will move forward with testing whether available RA antagonists can alleviate observed abnormalities in these cells.

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