CRISPR Reactivation of the Fragile X Gene

CRISPR Reactivation of the Fragile X Gene

“We are trying to target the first event that goes wrong in fragile X syndrome”, says Todd, “One reason our previous attempts to develop treatments for fragile X syndrome have failed is that they’ve tried to target the downstream effects of losing the fragile X protein. The protein does many things… bypassing all the functions that it normally takes care of has proven difficult from a pharmacologic perspective.”

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University of Michigan researcher Peter Todd, MD, PhD, aims to selectively turn the fragile X gene back on in human cells

University of Michigan researcher Peter Todd, MD, PhD, aims to selectively turn the fragile X gene back on in human cells
Swimming Upstream Fish like salmon are born in fresh water streams and rivers. When the time comes for them to breed, they return to the stream of their birth to lay eggs in the same spot where they were born. To accomplish this, they must swim upstream against the current or flow of the stream. Taking a page out of the salmon DNA playbook, University of Michigan scientists Peter Todd, MD, PhD, and postdoctoral fellow Jill Haenfler, Ph.D., are exploring unchartered waters to find a cure for Fragile X Syndrome. The researchers are adapting CRISPR research to reactivate the FMR1 gene, which provides instructions for making a protein called FMRP — needed for normal brain development. CRISPR, pronounced “crisper”, is a new and innovative technique to cut and paste DNA in human cells. “Previous Fragile X research has focused on the consequences of a loss of FMRP” said Todd, anRead more