Enhancing NMDA Receptor Signaling to Treat Fragile X Syndrome

Enhancing NMDA Receptor Signaling to Treat Fragile X Syndrome

Dr. Stephanie Barnes has been investigating the role of NMDA receptors as a FRAXA Postdoctoral Fellow in Dr. Emily Osterweil’s laboratory at the University of Edinburgh from 2016-2018. With an additional year grant from FRAXA, she is now continuing her work to identify novel targets and test pharmacological therapies in the Fragile X mouse model at the Picower Institute at MIT with Dr. Mark Bear.

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Non-Invasive Imaging as a Biomarker for Fragile X Clinical Trials

Non-Invasive Imaging as a Biomarker for Fragile X Clinical Trials

FRAXA Research Foundation has renewed Kamilla Castro’s 2017 FRAXA Fellowship for a second year. With this $90,000 award, Kamilla Castro and Principal Investigator Dr. Andreas Frick are using non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methodology to assess connectivity changes in the brain in Fragile X. If this project is successful, we will have objective outcome measures to evaluate new treatments, both in mice bred to mimic Fragile X and in human patients.

Andreas Frick and Kamila CastroRead more

Correcting Fragile X Syndrome Deficits by Targeting Neonatal PKCepsilon Signaling in the Brain

Correcting Fragile X Syndrome Deficits by Targeting Neonatal PKCepsilon Signaling in the Brain

FRAXA Research Foundation has made a 2017 grant of $90,000 to Probal Banerjee, PhD, at the College of Staten Island (CUNY). He is exploring a therapeutic strategy based on correcting abnormalities in the PKCepsilon signaling pathway in Fragile X.

Banerjee team at College of Staten IslandRead more

Altered Neural Excitability and Chronic Anxiety in a Mouse Model of Fragile X

Altered Neural Excitability and Chronic Anxiety in a Mouse Model of Fragile X

With a $35,000 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation in 2016, Dr. Peter Vanderklish at Scripps Research Institute, and colleagues, explored the basis of anxiety in Fragile X syndrome.

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Development of a High-Content Synapse Assay to Screen Therapeutics for Fragile X Syndrome

Development of a High-Content Synapse Assay to Screen Therapeutics for Fragile X Syndrome

With a $45,000 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation in 2009, Dr. Mark Bear and Dr. Asha Bhakar used High Content Screening (HCS) to develop an assay sensitive to the effect of the FXS genotype. This project was funded in full by NIH after the first year.

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Preclinical Testing of Sleep-Wake Patterns as an Outcome Measure for Fragile X

Preclinical Testing of Sleep-Wake Patterns as an Outcome Measure for Fragile X

FRAXA Research Foundation awarded $122,000 over 2016-2018 to Dr. Cara Westmark at the University of Wisconsin at Madison for studies of sleep disorders in Fragile X syndrome.

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Which is the right FMRP for Therapeutic Development of Fragile X Syndrome?

Which is the right FMRP for Therapeutic Development of Fragile X Syndrome?

With a 2-year, $90,000 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation over 2016-17, Dr. Samie Jaffrey at Weill Medical College of Cornell University explored which FMRP isoform is the best target to treat Fragile X syndrome.

Samie Jaffrey, PhD, at Weill Medical College of Cornell University, FRAXA research grantRead more

Sensory Hypersensibility in Fragile X Syndrome and BK Channel Openers

Sensory Hypersensibility in Fragile X Syndrome and BK Channel Openers

With $366,100 in grants from FRAXA Research Foundation, these investigators at the University of Orleans studied sensory abnormalities in Fragile X mice and test the ability of a class of drugs, BK channel openers, to rescue these abnormalities.

FRAXA Research Team. From left to right: Sandrine Lefeuvre (PhD, Pharmacologist), Sylvain Briault (MD, PhD, head of the team), Julie Maublanc (PhD student, Pharmacologist), Olivier Perche (PhD, hospital engineer), Béatrice Laudier (MD, PhD student), Betty Hébert (PhD student), Arnaud Menuet (PhD, assistant professor) and Jacques Pichon (Professor, Dr es Science).Read more

MicroRNAs as Biomarkers in Fragile X Syndrome

MicroRNAs as Biomarkers in Fragile X Syndrome

With a $90,000 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation in 2015-2016, Dr. Mollie Meffert and Dr. Christina Timmerman at Johns Hopkins University studied groups of small RNAs, known as microRNAs, which are greatly decreased in brain tissue of Fragile X mice vs. normal controls.

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Repurposing Drugs to Dampen Hyperactive Nonsense-Mediated Decay in Fragile X Syndrome

Repurposing Drugs to Dampen Hyperactive Nonsense-Mediated Decay in Fragile X Syndrome

With a $90,000 grant from the FRAXA Research Foundation, Dr. Lynne Maquat and Dr. Tatsuaki Kurosaki will investigate nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) in Fragile X. NMD is a “housekeeping” process that cells use to prevent faulty proteins from being made. But there is too much of it in Fragile X syndrome. There are already available drugs that suppress NMD – including caffeine.

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Altered Sleep in Fragile X Syndrome: Basis for a Potential Therapeutic Target

Altered Sleep in Fragile X Syndrome: Basis for a Potential Therapeutic Target

With a $90,000 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation over 2016-2018, Dr. Carolyn B. Smith and Dr. Rache Sare at the National Institute of Mental Health investigated the basis of sleep problems in Fragile X syndrome.

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Enhancement of NMDA Receptor Signaling for the Treatment of Fragile X Syndrome

Enhancement of NMDA Receptor Signaling for the Treatment of Fragile X Syndrome

FRAXA Research Foundation funded a 2016-2017 Fellowship for Dr. Stephanie Barnes in the University of Edinburgh lab of Dr. Emily Osterweil. With this $90,000 award, the team is investigating NMDA signaling in fragile X syndrome mice.

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Targeting AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway in Fragile X Syndrome

Targeting AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway in Fragile X Syndrome

With a $100,000 grant from the FRAXA Research Foundation in 2015, Dr. Peter Vanderklish explored a novel strategy to treat Fragile X syndrome: AMPK activators. The good news is that there are FDA approved (for example, metformin) and naturally occurring AMPK activators (such as resveratrol, found in red wine).

Peter Vanderklish, PhD, at Scripps Research Institute, FRAXA research grantRead more

Targeting the Endocannabinoid System in Adult Fragile X Mice

Targeting the Endocannabinoid System in Adult Fragile X Mice

With a $90,000 grant from the FRAXA Research Foundation from 2013-2014, Dr. Andres Ozaita led a team to test rimonabant’s ability to blockade the CB1 receptor. Blocking CB1 has shown potential to reverse most symptoms of disease in mice bred to mimic Fragile X syndrome.

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Seizures in Fragile X Syndrome and Therapeutic Potential of NMDA Receptor Antagonists

Seizures in Fragile X Syndrome and Therapeutic Potential of NMDA Receptor Antagonists

With a $90,000 grant from the FRAXA Research Foundation, Dr. Robert Wong is investigating how seizures are generated in Fragile X neurons. More generally, he is looking at how synapses are modified to enable learning and memory and how this process is impaired in Fragile X.

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Social Behavior as an Outcome Measure for Fragile X Clinical Trials

Social Behavior as an Outcome Measure for Fragile X Clinical Trials

One of the features of the Fragile X mouse model which is relevant to the human Fragile X syndrome (and autism) is social behavior. Several tests show consistent social behavioral abnormalities in the Fragile X mouse model. With a $140,000 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation in 2012-2013, Dr. Willemsen at Erasmus University used social behavior tests to measure the effectiveness of several drug strategies.

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Research Grants to Dr. Kimberly Huber 2000-2010

Research Grants to Dr. Kimberly Huber 2000-2010

With a $474,300 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation from 2000-2013, Dr. Kimberly Huber and her team at the University of Texas conducted several studies on the relationship between mGluR5 and Fragile X syndrome. Dr. Huber made the original discovery of the mGluR Theory of Fragile X when she was a postdoctoral fellow in the lab of Dr. Mark Bear, with her first FRAXA grant in 2000.

Kimberly Huber, Ph.D., FRAXA InvestigatorRead more

Evaluation of CamKII Dependent Regulation of mGluR5-Homer Scaffolds as a Potential Therapeutic for Fragile X Syndrome

Evaluation of CamKII Dependent Regulation of mGluR5-Homer Scaffolds as a Potential Therapeutic for Fragile X Syndrome

With a $90,000 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation, Dr. Kimberly Huber and Dr. Weirui Guo at the University of Texas at Southwestern investigated the roles of Homer and CaMKII in Fragile X syndrome.

Kimberly Huber, Ph.D., FRAXA InvestigatorRead more

Synaptic Actin Signaling Pathways in Fragile X

Synaptic Actin Signaling Pathways in Fragile X

With a $163,356 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation in 2010-12, Dr. Scott Soderling and Dr. Hwan Kim at Duke University bred the standard mouse model of Fragile X syndrome to their lines of mice that express reduced levels of several key proteins that modulate synaptic actin. These compound mutant mice were compared to FXS mice to determine if genetically impairing pathways to the actin cytoskeleton can rescue deficits in the FXS mice.

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Genetic and Pharmacologic Manipulation of PI3K Activity in FXS: Assessing Potential Therapeutic Value

Genetic and Pharmacologic Manipulation of PI3K Activity in FXS: Assessing Potential Therapeutic Value

With a $90,000 grant from the FRAXA Research Foundation, Dr. Gary Bassell and his team at Emory University explored the PI3K/mTOR signaling complex in FXS via genetic and pharmacologic rescue approaches, to reduce the enzymatic function of specific components of this complex pathway in an FXS mouse model.

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Channelopathies: Altered Ion Channels in Fragile X Syndrome

Channelopathies: Altered Ion Channels in Fragile X Syndrome

With a $95,000 grant from FRAXA Research Foundation from 2010-2011, Dr. Daniel Johnston and Dr. Darrin Brager at the University of Texas at Austin investigated alterations in ion channels in Fragile X syndrome. They explored potential therapeutic effects of drugs which open and close these channels. Results published.

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